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The Importance of Nutrition Assessments-Tuesday Tube Facts

Did you know…?

Nutrition assessment data provides essential information about whether EN is indicated and can be administered safely. [1]

Nutrition status, including the presence or risk of malnutrition, also influences the effectiveness and safety of implementing EN administration. [1]

References:

  1. Boullata, Joseph I., et al. “ASPEN Safe Practices for Enteral Nutrition Therapy.” Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, vol. 41, no. 1, 2016, pp. 15–103., doi:10.1177/0148607116673053. 

NEVER bolus feed the J-port of a GJ tube-Tuesday Tube Facts

Did you know…?

It is important to NEVER bolus feed the J-port of a GJ tube. The intestine is not able to hold as large of a volume as the stomach can.[1]

It is not uncommon to see continuous feeds of 20 hours a day or more with GJ tubes, especially at the beginning of feeding.[1]

References:

  1. Feeding Tube Awareness Foundation. Gastro-Jejunal (GJ) Tubes, 3 Mar. 2020, www.feedingtubeawareness.org/gj-tubes/.

Eating solid food-Tuesday Tube Facts

Did you know…?

A patient may fear that once a feeding tube is placed, they will never be able to eat solid food again. If the patient can eat by mouth safely, then they can eat food and supplement with the tube feeding.[1]

Eating food will not cause damage to the tube, nor does having a feeding tube make it unsafe to eat.[1]

References:

  1. Soelberg, MS, RD, LDN , Juliette. 5 Misconceptions about Feeding TUBES: Dietitians on Demand. Edited by Kimberly Brown, MS, RD/LD, 27 Apr. 2021, dietitiansondemand.com/top-5-questions-and-misconceptions-about-feeding-tubes/. 

Nutrition and Hydration for long-term care-Tuesday Tube Facts

Did you know…?

Long term care residents nutrition and hydration statuses are tracked by state and federal surveyors. Elderly population malnutrition is associated with poor clinical outcomes and increased mortality.[1]

Residents with severe malnutrition are also at increased risk for developing a number of chronic medical conditions.[1]

References:

  1. Carlson, RD , Deirdre, and Anita Kilmanis, RD, LDN. “What Long Term Care Dietitians Need To Know About the MDS 3.0: Dietitians On Demand.” Dietitians On Demand | Professional Recruiting Services for Contract and Permanent-Hire Positions., 30 Mar. 2021, dietitiansondemand.com/what-long-term-care-dietitians-need-to-know-about-the-mds-3-0/.

Water and EN-Tuesday Tube Facts

Did you know…?

Patients receiving enteral therapy have multiple points of interface with water. Most drinking water may be considered safe for healthy individuals, but the types and concentrations of contaminants may pose risks to EN patients.[1]

Contaminants may be chemical or biologic; pathogenic microorganisms are included in the latter.[1]

References:

  1. Boullata, Joseph I., et al. ASPEN Safe Practices for Enteral Nutrition Therapy. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, vol. 41, no. 1, 2016, pp. 15–103., doi:10.1177/0148607116673053.