fbpx

G Tube and blockage-Tuesday Tube Facts

Did you know…?

Gastrostomy tubes may become blocked by gastric mucosal overgrowth, which requires surgery. Tube blockage or intraperitoneal leakage can be assessed using water-soluble contrast.[1]

References:

  1. Gavi, S., Hensley, J., Cervo, F., Nicastri, C., Fields, S. Management of Feeding Tube Complications in the Long-Term Care Resident. Annals of Long-Term Care. 2008. 16(4):28-32.

Liquid Medications & Tube Clogging-Tuesday Tube Facts

Did you know…?

Some Liquid medications contribute to tube clogging when exposed to enteral nutrition formula. Liquid syrups, for instance, cause clumping and lead to tube clogging. [1]

lansoprazole oral suspension granules, sucralfate suspension, and mineral oil are known to clog feeding tubes.[1]

References:

  1. Schallom, Marilyn. “How to Recognize, Prevent, and Troubleshoot Mechanical Complications of Enteral Feeding Tubes.” American Nurse, 23 July 2020, www.myamericannurse.com/recognize-prevent-troubleshoot-mechanical-complications-enteral-feeding-tubes/.

Eating solid food-Tuesday Tube Facts

Did you know…?

A patient may fear that once a feeding tube is placed, they will never be able to eat solid food again. If the patient can eat by mouth safely, then they can eat food and supplement with the tube feeding.[1]

Eating food will not cause damage to the tube, nor does having a feeding tube make it unsafe to eat.[1]

References:

  1. Soelberg, MS, RD, LDN , Juliette. 5 Misconceptions about Feeding TUBES: Dietitians on Demand. Edited by Kimberly Brown, MS, RD/LD, 27 Apr. 2021, dietitiansondemand.com/top-5-questions-and-misconceptions-about-feeding-tubes/. 

Drug absorption-Tuesday Tube Facts

Did you know…?

Some medications may not be administered with enteral formulas because they form precipitates that may clog the feeding tube and reduce drug absorption.[1]

To avoid compromising nutritional status, minimize the amount of time that feeding is interrupted by using once or twice daily dosage regimens.[3]

References:

  1. Beckwith, M. C., Feddema, S. S., Barton, R. G., & Graves, C. (2004). A Guide to Drug Therapy in Patients with Enteral Feeding Tubes: Dosage Form Selection and Administration Methods. Hospital Pharmacy, 39(3), 225–237. https://doi.org/10.1177/001857870403900308