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Medication suitable for manipulation – Tuesday Tube Facts

Did you know…?

Before a medication in a solid dosage form is administered through a feeding tube, it should be determined if the medication is suitable for manipulation, such as crushing a tablet or opening a capsule.[1]

References:

  1. Williams NT. Medication administration through enteral feeding tubes. Am J Health Syst Pharm. 2008 Dec 15;65(24):2347-57. doi: 10.2146/ajhp080155. PMID: 19052281.

Checking medications for G or J port-Tuesday Tube Facts

Did you know…?

It is important to check which medications should be given through the G-port and/or the J-port. Some medications can only be absorbed in the stomach, therefore, they must be given through the G-port. Others can be given safely through either port.[1]

References:

  1. Feeding Tube Awareness Foundation. Gastro-Jejunal (GJ) Tubes, 3 Mar. 2020, www.feedingtubeawareness.org/gj-tubes/.

Sugar in Liquid Medications-Tuesday Tube Facts

References:

  1. Marilyn Schallom. How to recognize, prevent, and troubleshoot mechanical complications of enteral feeding tubes. MyAmericanNurse, Feb 2016. https://www.myamericannurse.com/recognize-prevent-troubleshoot-mechanical-complications-enteral-feeding-tubes/.

Liquid Medications & Tube Clogging-Tuesday Tube Facts

Did you know…?

Some Liquid medications contribute to tube clogging when exposed to enteral nutrition formula. Liquid syrups, for instance, cause clumping and lead to tube clogging. [1]

lansoprazole oral suspension granules, sucralfate suspension, and mineral oil are known to clog feeding tubes.[1]

References:

  1. Schallom, Marilyn. “How to Recognize, Prevent, and Troubleshoot Mechanical Complications of Enteral Feeding Tubes.” American Nurse, 23 July 2020, www.myamericannurse.com/recognize-prevent-troubleshoot-mechanical-complications-enteral-feeding-tubes/.

NEVER bolus feed the J-port of a GJ tube-Tuesday Tube Facts

Did you know…?

It is important to NEVER bolus feed the J-port of a GJ tube. The intestine is not able to hold as large of a volume as the stomach can.[1]

It is not uncommon to see continuous feeds of 20 hours a day or more with GJ tubes, especially at the beginning of feeding.[1]

References:

  1. Feeding Tube Awareness Foundation. Gastro-Jejunal (GJ) Tubes, 3 Mar. 2020, www.feedingtubeawareness.org/gj-tubes/.