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NEVER bolus feed the J-port of a GJ tube-Tuesday Tube Facts

Did you know…?

It is important to NEVER bolus feed the J-port of a GJ tube. The intestine is not able to hold as large of a volume as the stomach can.[1]

It is not uncommon to see continuous feeds of 20 hours a day or more with GJ tubes, especially at the beginning of feeding.[1]

References:

  1. Feeding Tube Awareness Foundation. Gastro-Jejunal (GJ) Tubes, 3 Mar. 2020, www.feedingtubeawareness.org/gj-tubes/.

Water and EN-Tuesday Tube Facts

Did you know…?

Patients receiving enteral therapy have multiple points of interface with water. Most drinking water may be considered safe for healthy individuals, but the types and concentrations of contaminants may pose risks to EN patients.[1]

Contaminants may be chemical or biologic; pathogenic microorganisms are included in the latter.[1]

References:

  1. Boullata, Joseph I., et al. ASPEN Safe Practices for Enteral Nutrition Therapy. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, vol. 41, no. 1, 2016, pp. 15–103., doi:10.1177/0148607116673053.

Malnutrition Prevalent in Older Adults – Tuesday Tube Facts

Did you know…?

Malnutrition is highest among older adults (65+). Hospital stays with malnutrition are 2x longer than those without.[1]

Patients treated for Covid-19 may require a feeding tube to help supplement their nutrition to fight the infection.[2] Keeping these tubes clear by proactively using the TubeClear system may help maintain feeding tube flow so these patients keep getting the nutrition they need for recovery.[3]

References:

  1. Barrett ML, Bailey MK, Owens PL. “Non-maternal and Non-neonatal Inpatient Stays in the United States Involving Malnutrition.” U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. 2016. https://hcup-us.ahrq.gov/reports/HCUPMalnutritionHospReport_083018.pdf
  2. Garcia-Navarro, Lulu, host. “What Is The Treatment For COVID-19 Patients? A Doctor Explains.” Weekend Edition Sunday, NPR. March 15, 2020. https://www.npr.org/2020/03/15/816042230/what-is-the-treatment-for-covid-19-patients-a-doctor-explains
  3. Actuated Medical Inc. TubeClear Prophylactic Test Report: 1100791569, Rev002. 2019.

Thick Formulas and Medications Clog Smaller EADs – Tuesday Tube Facts

Thick Formulas and Medications Clog Smaller EADs – Tuesday Tube Facts

Clogging is especially common when thick formulas and medications are delivered through feeding tubes with smaller French sizes.[1]

If multiple medications must be delivered, it is recommended that each medication be delivered separately.[2]

1. Blumenstein I, Shastri YM, Stein J. Gastroenteric tube feeding: techniques, problems and solutions. World J Gastroenterol. 2014. 20(26):8505-24.

2. Kenny, D., & Goodman, P. Care of the patient with enteral tube feeding: An evidence-based practice protocol. Nursing Research. January/February 2010. 59(1S), S22-S31.

Impact of Improper Drug Administration in EADs – Tuesday Tube Facts

Impact of Improper Drug Administration in EADs – Tuesday Tube Facts

Improper drug administration can lead to a feeding tube clog, increased toxicity, or reduced efficacy of the drug.*

Medications cause occlusion in approximately 15% of patients with enteral feeding tubes.*

* Beckwith, M. C., Feddema, S. S., Barton, R. G., & Graves, C. (2004). A Guide to Drug Therapy in Patients with Enteral Feeding Tubes: Dosage Form Selection and Administration Methods. Hospital Pharmacy, 39(3), 225–237. https://doi.org/10.1177/001857870403900308