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Cost Savings From a SNF in Utah-Tuesday Tube Facts

Did you know…?

SNF patients often require ambulance transport to the hospital to replace a feeding tube. The cost of replacement, transportation, and staff support has been found to be greater than $4,220. [1]

A respiratory therapist may accompany a resident during transportation and during the procedure which costs an average of $250. The placement procedure has an average cost of $2,670, including professional fees. Transportation cost totals $1,300.[1]

References:

  1. Buckley, Robert, and Steve Heisa. “Clinical Study of Mechanical Enteral Tube Declogging.” The TubeClear System, Aug. 2021.

Checking medications for G or J port-Tuesday Tube Facts

Did you know…?

It is important to check which medications should be given through the G-port and/or the J-port. Some medications can only be absorbed in the stomach, therefore, they must be given through the G-port. Others can be given safely through either port.[1]

References:

  1. Feeding Tube Awareness Foundation. Gastro-Jejunal (GJ) Tubes, 3 Mar. 2020, www.feedingtubeawareness.org/gj-tubes/.

Sugar in Liquid Medications-Tuesday Tube Facts

References:

  1. Marilyn Schallom. How to recognize, prevent, and troubleshoot mechanical complications of enteral feeding tubes. MyAmericanNurse, Feb 2016. https://www.myamericannurse.com/recognize-prevent-troubleshoot-mechanical-complications-enteral-feeding-tubes/.

Liquid Medications & Tube Clogging-Tuesday Tube Facts

Did you know…?

Some Liquid medications contribute to tube clogging when exposed to enteral nutrition formula. Liquid syrups, for instance, cause clumping and lead to tube clogging. [1]

lansoprazole oral suspension granules, sucralfate suspension, and mineral oil are known to clog feeding tubes.[1]

References:

  1. Schallom, Marilyn. “How to Recognize, Prevent, and Troubleshoot Mechanical Complications of Enteral Feeding Tubes.” American Nurse, 23 July 2020, www.myamericannurse.com/recognize-prevent-troubleshoot-mechanical-complications-enteral-feeding-tubes/.

Water and EN-Tuesday Tube Facts

Did you know…?

Patients receiving enteral therapy have multiple points of interface with water. Most drinking water may be considered safe for healthy individuals, but the types and concentrations of contaminants may pose risks to EN patients.[1]

Contaminants may be chemical or biologic; pathogenic microorganisms are included in the latter.[1]

References:

  1. Boullata, Joseph I., et al. ASPEN Safe Practices for Enteral Nutrition Therapy. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, vol. 41, no. 1, 2016, pp. 15–103., doi:10.1177/0148607116673053.