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95% obstruction of feeding tubes – Tuesday Tube Facts

Did you know…?

Obstruction in feeding tubes was reported in 95% of the admixtures with incompatibility.[1]

Managing the schedule of administration of nutrition and medication, and giving enough interval time between medications will theoretically reduce the incidence of medication-nutrition interactions, and diminish incompatibilities that cause obstructions.[1]

References:

  1. Hosam Mohammed Alsamet, Considerations regarding oral medications delivery to patients on nasoenteral tubes, Nutrition Clinique et Métabolisme, Volume 36, Issue 1, 2022, Pages 21-27, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nupar.2021.09.002.

EN-related readmissions – Tuesday Tube Facts

Did you know…?

Among EN-related readmissions, 44.6% (33/72) documented enteral access device-related issues, 40.5% (30/74) cited symptoms attributed to EN, and 14.9% (11/74) attributed sodium imbalance from dehydration.[1]

References:

  1. Palchaudhuri, S, Mehta, SJ, Snider, CK, et al. Causes of readmissions for patients discharged on enteral nutrition. J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 2022; 1- 5. doi:10.1002/jpen.2331

FDA Feeding Tube Warning – Tuesday Tube Facts

Did you know…?

The FDA has put out a warning & recommendation for pediatric feeding tubes. If your child is injured by a feeding set tubing, please report the event to the FDA. Your report, along with information from other sources, can provide information that helps improve patient safety.[1]

References:

  1. Pedersen, Amanda. “FDA Warns of Pediatric Feeding Tube Strangulation.” Medical Device and Diagnostic Industry, 8 Feb. 2022, https://www.mddionline.com/regulatory-quality/fda-warns-pediatric-feeding-tube-strangulation?ADTRK=InformaMarkets&elq_mid=20876&elq_cid=8727

Malnourished Patients – Tuesday Tube Facts

Did you know…?

An observational study found that in 416 patients, 31.7% were malnourished upon admission. Malnourished patients were significantly older (67.8 vs 57.6 years, P<.001) and had a lower BMI (26.2 vs 32.4 kg/m2, P<.001) than non malnourished patients.[1]

Malnourished patients had higher odds of having a LOS ≥3 days (2.38 [95% CI 1.45-3.88], P<.001) and higher odds of readmitting within 30 days.[1]

References:

  1. Lengfelder, L., Mahlke, S., Moore, L., Zhang, X., Williams, G., III and Lee, J. (2022), Prevalence and impact of malnutrition on length of stay, readmission, and discharge destination. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition. Accepted Author Manuscript. https://doi.org/10.1002/jpen.2322