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Nutrition and Hydration for long-term care-Tuesday Tube Facts

Did you know…?

Long term care residents nutrition and hydration statuses are tracked by state and federal surveyors. Elderly population malnutrition is associated with poor clinical outcomes and increased mortality.[1]

Residents with severe malnutrition are also at increased risk for developing a number of chronic medical conditions.[1]

References:

  1. Carlson, RD , Deirdre, and Anita Kilmanis, RD, LDN. “What Long Term Care Dietitians Need To Know About the MDS 3.0: Dietitians On Demand.” Dietitians On Demand | Professional Recruiting Services for Contract and Permanent-Hire Positions., 30 Mar. 2021, dietitiansondemand.com/what-long-term-care-dietitians-need-to-know-about-the-mds-3-0/.

Water and EN-Tuesday Tube Facts

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Patients receiving enteral therapy have multiple points of interface with water. Most drinking water may be considered safe for healthy individuals, but the types and concentrations of contaminants may pose risks to EN patients.[1]

Contaminants may be chemical or biologic; pathogenic microorganisms are included in the latter.[1]

References:

  1. Boullata, Joseph I., et al. ASPEN Safe Practices for Enteral Nutrition Therapy. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, vol. 41, no. 1, 2016, pp. 15–103., doi:10.1177/0148607116673053.

ICU Nutritional Practice-Tuesday Tube Facts

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For enteral Covid-19 patients, feeding tube placement and aspiration are potential aerosol generating procedures.[1]

Tip to decrease Covid-19 exposure due to aerosol generating procedures: Decrease exposure by quicker gastric tube placement rather than postpyloric placement.[3]

References:

  1. Rimensberger, Peter C., et al. “Caring for Critically Ill Children with Suspected or Proven Coronavirus Disease 2019 Infection: Recommendations by the Scientific Sections’ Collaborative of the European Society of Pediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care.” Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, vol. 22, no. 1, 2020, pp. 56–67., doi:10.1097/pcc.0000000000002599.

Timing of nutrition for Covid-19 patients-Tuesday Tube Facts

Did you know…?

For Covid-19 patients that require ICU care, the timing of enteral nutrition delivery is an important issue to improve mortality and reduce infections.[1]

Initiating early enteral nutrition within 24-36 hours of admission to the ICU or within 12 hours of intubation and placement on mechanical ventilation should be the goal to address critical care nutritional needs of Covid-19 patients.[3]

References:

  1. Martindale, R., Patel, J., Taylor, B., Warren, M., McClave, S. Nutrition Therapy in the Patient with COVID-19 Disease Requiring ICU Care. Reviewed and Approved by the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition. Updated May 26, 2020.

BTF for adult patients-Tuesday Tube Facts

Did you know…?

Common indications for Blenderized Tube Feeding (BTF) with adult patients typically includes patients who are expected to be on tube feeding long term.[1]

Typical conditions/disease states include, Oncology, Stroke, ALS, Dysphagia, and TBI. BTF is commonly used in Acute Care, Post Acute Care, and Outpatient settings.[3]

References:

1. Johnson , Teresa, director. Blenderized Tube Feeding for Adult Enteral Nutrition Patients. YouTube, ASPEN , 3 Nov. 2020.                                                       

  1.                 www.youtube.com/watch?v=TX1lVPWQk_w&t=1s. 

Drug absorption-Tuesday Tube Facts

Did you know…?

Some medications may not be administered with enteral formulas because they form precipitates that may clog the feeding tube and reduce drug absorption.[1]

To avoid compromising nutritional status, minimize the amount of time that feeding is interrupted by using once or twice daily dosage regimens.[3]

References:

  1. Beckwith, M. C., Feddema, S. S., Barton, R. G., & Graves, C. (2004). A Guide to Drug Therapy in Patients with Enteral Feeding Tubes: Dosage Form Selection and Administration Methods. Hospital Pharmacy, 39(3), 225–237. https://doi.org/10.1177/001857870403900308