fbpx

Cpt code -Tuesday Tube Facts

Did you know…?

CPT Code 49460 is for the mechanical removal of obstructions from feeding tubes under fluoroscopic guidance.[1]

Specifically, the code states:

Mechanical removal of obstructive material from gastrostomy, duodenostomy, jejunostomy, gastro-jejunostomy, or cecostomy (or other colonic) tube, any method, under fluoroscopic guidance including contrast injection(s), if performed, image documentation and report.

1.References:https://www.bostonscientific.com/content/dam/bostonscientific/Reimbursement/Gastroenterology/pdf/Enteral_Feeding_Coding_and_Payment_Quick_Reference.pdf

Water Not Effective-Tuesday Tube Facts

Did you know…?

In one study, water was found to clear clogged tubes only 20% of the time.[1]

References:

  1. Garrison, C. M. Enteral Feeding Tube Clogging: What Are the Causes and What Are the Answers? A Bench Top Analysis. Nutrition in Clinical Practice. 2018. 33(1):147-150.
  2. Dandeles, L. and Lodolee, A. Efficacy of Agents to Prevent and Treat Enteral Feeding Tube Clogs. The Annals of Pharmacotherapy. 2011. 45:676-680.

Cola doesn’t dissolve formula-Tuesday Tube Facts

Did you know…?

Cola does not dissolve formula-based clogs in feeding tubes.[1]

References:

  1. Klang, M.; Gandhi, U.; Mironova, O. Dissolving a Nutrition Clog With a New Pancreatic Enzyme Formulation. Nutrition in Clinical Practice. 2013. 28:410-412.
  2. Dandeles, L. and Lodolee, A. Efficacy of Agents to Prevent and Treat Enteral Feeding Tube Clogs. The Annals of Pharmacotherapy. 2011. 45:676-680.

Clogged Feeding Tubes Interrupt Nutrition – Tuesday Tube Facts

Surgical ICU patients with a least one interruption to their enteral nutrition experience a higher calorie deficit than those with no interruptions.[2]

References:

  1. Bourgault, A.M., Heyland, D.K., Drover, J.W., Keefe, L., Newman, P., and Day, A. G. Prophylactic Pancreatic Enzymes to Reduce Feeding Tube Occlusions. American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition. 2003. 18:398-401.
  2. Peev, M. P., Yeh, D. D., Quraishi, S. A., Osler, P. , Chang, Y. , Gillis, E. , Albano, C. E., Darak, S. and Velmahos, G. C. Causes and Consequences of Interrupted Enteral Nutrition. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition. 2015. 39: 21-27.

Patients on EN in ICU Receive just 60% of Nutrition – Tuesday Tube Facts

Did you know…?

ICU patients with feeding tubes receive an average of 60% of their required nutrition.

[1,2]

Critically ill patients are at an increased risk for malnutrition because of alterations in protein and energy metabolism displayed in response to trauma, major surgery, burns, and sepsis.[2]

References:

  1. Guenter, P., Read, J. ASPEN Enteral Nutrition by the Numbers: EN Data Across the Healthcare Continuum. American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition. 2017.
  2. Stewart, M.L. Interruptions in Enteral Nutrition Delivery in Critically Ill Patients and Recommendations for Clinical Practice. Critical Care Nurse. 2014. 34(4):14-22