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Malnutrition Prevalent in Older Adults – Tuesday Tube Facts

Did you know…?

Malnutrition is highest among older adults (65+). Hospital stays with malnutrition are 2x longer than those without.[1]

Patients treated for Covid-19 may require a feeding tube to help supplement their nutrition to fight the infection.[2] Keeping these tubes clear by proactively using the TubeClear system may help maintain feeding tube flow so these patients keep getting the nutrition they need for recovery.[3]

References:

  1. Barrett ML, Bailey MK, Owens PL. “Non-maternal and Non-neonatal Inpatient Stays in the United States Involving Malnutrition.” U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. 2016. https://hcup-us.ahrq.gov/reports/HCUPMalnutritionHospReport_083018.pdf
  2. Garcia-Navarro, Lulu, host. “What Is The Treatment For COVID-19 Patients? A Doctor Explains.” Weekend Edition Sunday, NPR. March 15, 2020. https://www.npr.org/2020/03/15/816042230/what-is-the-treatment-for-covid-19-patients-a-doctor-explains
  3. Actuated Medical Inc. TubeClear Prophylactic Test Report: 1100791569, Rev002. 2019.

Acidic Fluids May Coagulate or Thicken Clogs – Tuesday Tube Facts

Did you know…?

The use of acidic liquids to clear a clogged feeding tube may make the problem worse.[1,2]

Enteral feeding proteins coagulate or thicken in an acidic environment.[1,2]

References:

  1. Dandeles LM, Lodolce AE. Efficacy of agents to prevent and treat enteral feeding tube clogs. Ann Pharmacother. 2011;45:676-680.
  2. Williams NT.Medication administration through enteral feeding tubes. Am J Health-Syst Pharm. 2008;65:2347-2357.

Dried Clogs Are More Difficult – Tuesday Tube Facts

Did you know…?

The drier a clog is inside a feeding tube, the more difficult it is to remove.[1]

Simulated clogs composed of dried-out coagulated protein were more difficult to clear than those that contained wet coagulated protein.[1]

References:

  1. Garrison, C. M. Enteral Feeding Tube Clogging: What Are the Causes and What Are the Answers? A Bench Top Analysis. Nutrition in Clinical Practice. 2018. 33(1):147-150.