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95% obstruction of feeding tubes – Tuesday Tube Facts

Did you know…?

Obstruction in feeding tubes was reported in 95% of the admixtures with incompatibility.[1]

Managing the schedule of administration of nutrition and medication, and giving enough interval time between medications will theoretically reduce the incidence of medication-nutrition interactions, and diminish incompatibilities that cause obstructions.[1]

References:

  1. Hosam Mohammed Alsamet, Considerations regarding oral medications delivery to patients on nasoenteral tubes, Nutrition Clinique et Métabolisme, Volume 36, Issue 1, 2022, Pages 21-27, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nupar.2021.09.002.

Clogs Occurred in Average 3.8 Days Following Placement – Tuesday Tube Facts

Did you know…?

In 5 of 6 clogged feeding tubes, the blockage occurred in an average of just 3.8 days following initial tube placement.[1]

In all cases, the clinician was able to clear the clogs using the TubeClear system, keeping those tubes in place and avoiding replacement.

References:

  1. Belcher, M. “An Active Device for Restoring Patency in Clogged Small Bore Feeding and Decompression Tubes, Case Report Series.” 2016.

Impact of Improper Drug Administration in EADs – Tuesday Tube Facts

Impact of Improper Drug Administration in EADs – Tuesday Tube Facts

Improper drug administration can lead to a feeding tube clog, increased toxicity, or reduced efficacy of the drug.*

Medications cause occlusion in approximately 15% of patients with enteral feeding tubes.*

* Beckwith, M. C., Feddema, S. S., Barton, R. G., & Graves, C. (2004). A Guide to Drug Therapy in Patients with Enteral Feeding Tubes: Dosage Form Selection and Administration Methods. Hospital Pharmacy, 39(3), 225–237. https://doi.org/10.1177/001857870403900308

Drugs Administered Incorrectly via Feeding Tubes – Tuesday Tube Facts

Drugs Administered Incorrectly via Feeding Tubes – Tuesday Tube Facts

Improper drug administration can lead to feeding tube occlusion, increased toxicity or reduced efficacy of the drug.*

According to one survey, 74% of hospital staff used at least 2 incorrect methods to administer drugs via feeding tubes.*

* Beckwith, M. C., Feddema, S. S., Barton, R. G., & Graves, C. (2004). A Guide to Drug Therapy in Patients with Enteral Feeding Tubes: Dosage Form Selection and Administration Methods. Hospital Pharmacy, 39(3), 225–237. https://doi.org/10.1177/001857870403900308