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Malnutrition Prevalent in Older Adults – Tuesday Tube Facts

Did you know…?

Malnutrition is highest among older adults (65+). Hospital stays with malnutrition are 2x longer than those without.[1]

Patients treated for Covid-19 may require a feeding tube to help supplement their nutrition to fight the infection.[2] Keeping these tubes clear by proactively using the TubeClear system may help maintain feeding tube flow so these patients keep getting the nutrition they need for recovery.[3]

References:

  1. Barrett ML, Bailey MK, Owens PL. “Non-maternal and Non-neonatal Inpatient Stays in the United States Involving Malnutrition.” U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. 2016. https://hcup-us.ahrq.gov/reports/HCUPMalnutritionHospReport_083018.pdf
  2. Garcia-Navarro, Lulu, host. “What Is The Treatment For COVID-19 Patients? A Doctor Explains.” Weekend Edition Sunday, NPR. March 15, 2020. https://www.npr.org/2020/03/15/816042230/what-is-the-treatment-for-covid-19-patients-a-doctor-explains
  3. Actuated Medical Inc. TubeClear Prophylactic Test Report: 1100791569, Rev002. 2019.

Thick Formulas and Medications Clog Smaller EADs – Tuesday Tube Facts

Thick Formulas and Medications Clog Smaller EADs – Tuesday Tube Facts

Clogging is especially common when thick formulas and medications are delivered through feeding tubes with smaller French sizes.[1]

If multiple medications must be delivered, it is recommended that each medication be delivered separately.[2]

1. Blumenstein I, Shastri YM, Stein J. Gastroenteric tube feeding: techniques, problems and solutions. World J Gastroenterol. 2014. 20(26):8505-24.

2. Kenny, D., & Goodman, P. Care of the patient with enteral tube feeding: An evidence-based practice protocol. Nursing Research. January/February 2010. 59(1S), S22-S31.

Impact of Improper Drug Administration in EADs – Tuesday Tube Facts

Impact of Improper Drug Administration in EADs – Tuesday Tube Facts

Improper drug administration can lead to a feeding tube clog, increased toxicity, or reduced efficacy of the drug.*

Medications cause occlusion in approximately 15% of patients with enteral feeding tubes.*

* Beckwith, M. C., Feddema, S. S., Barton, R. G., & Graves, C. (2004). A Guide to Drug Therapy in Patients with Enteral Feeding Tubes: Dosage Form Selection and Administration Methods. Hospital Pharmacy, 39(3), 225–237. https://doi.org/10.1177/001857870403900308