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Enteral Nutrition is Preferred-Tuesday Tube Facts

Did you know…?

Enteral nutrition is preferred over parenteral nutrition because it is less expensive and has a lower risk of complications.[1]

References:

  1. Hyeda A, Costa ÉSMD. Economic analysis of costs with enteral and parenteral nutritional therapy according to disease and outcome. Einstein. 2017. 15(2):192–199.

EN interruptions-Tuesday Tube Facts

Did you know…?

Enteral nutrition is often interrupted because of procedures, positioning, technical issues with feeding accesses, and gastrointestinal intolerance issues.[1]

References:

  1. Stewart, M.L. Interruptions in Enteral Nutrition Delivery in Critically Ill Patients and Recommendations for Clinical Practice. Critical Care Nurse. 2014. 34(4):14-22.
  2. Blumenstein, I., Shastri, Y.M., Stein, J. Gastroenteric tube feeding: techniques, problems and solutions. World J Gastroenterol. 2014. 20(26):8505-24.

EN in Home Care-Tuesday Tube Facts

Did you know…?

About 13% of home care patients receive enteral nutrition, according to the National Home Infusion Association (NHIA).[1]

References:

  1. Guenter, P., Read, J. ASPEN Enteral Nutrition by the Numbers: EN Data Across the Healthcare Continuum. American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition. 2017.
  2. Mundi, M.S., Pattisson, A., McMahon, M.T., Davidson, J., Hurt, R.T. Prevalence of home parenteral and enteral nutrition in the United States. Nutrition in Clinical Practice. 2017. 32:799-805.

Clogged Feeding Tubes Interrupt Nutrition – Tuesday Tube Facts

Surgical ICU patients with a least one interruption to their enteral nutrition experience a higher calorie deficit than those with no interruptions.[2]

References:

  1. Bourgault, A.M., Heyland, D.K., Drover, J.W., Keefe, L., Newman, P., and Day, A. G. Prophylactic Pancreatic Enzymes to Reduce Feeding Tube Occlusions. American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition. 2003. 18:398-401.
  2. Peev, M. P., Yeh, D. D., Quraishi, S. A., Osler, P. , Chang, Y. , Gillis, E. , Albano, C. E., Darak, S. and Velmahos, G. C. Causes and Consequences of Interrupted Enteral Nutrition. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition. 2015. 39: 21-27.

Patients on EN in ICU Receive just 60% of Nutrition – Tuesday Tube Facts

Did you know…?

ICU patients with feeding tubes receive an average of 60% of their required nutrition.

[1,2]

Critically ill patients are at an increased risk for malnutrition because of alterations in protein and energy metabolism displayed in response to trauma, major surgery, burns, and sepsis.[2]

References:

  1. Guenter, P., Read, J. ASPEN Enteral Nutrition by the Numbers: EN Data Across the Healthcare Continuum. American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition. 2017.
  2. Stewart, M.L. Interruptions in Enteral Nutrition Delivery in Critically Ill Patients and Recommendations for Clinical Practice. Critical Care Nurse. 2014. 34(4):14-22